UK to cut vaccines to the NW.

Bennys_was_a_mob

Well-known member
Question to ask is would this be happening if we in the North West were lagging behind other areas - ie if the South East had managed the the rollout as we have, would they then be reducing their vaccine availability?
 

Wizaard

Well-known member
Question to ask is would this be happening if we in the North West were lagging behind other areas - ie if the South East had managed the the rollout as we have, would they then be reducing their vaccine availability?
Of course not. Look at the tier system and how well that was managed.

Yorkshire having their supplies halved btw.
 

Lytham_fy8

Well-known member
If I miss my second dose I'm off to that there London to knock the pudgy faced twat Johnson out. Fat Etonion midget.
 

Lytham_fy8

Well-known member
Of course not. Look at the tier system and how well that was managed.

Yorkshire having their supplies halved btw.
Indeed.

The recent massive spike in infections has fuck all to do with keeping London in Tier 3, honest, it's actually all you Northerners having parties. Here, watch this BBC report on what a shambles the North is.
 
B

basilrobbie

Guest
If I miss my second dose I'm off to that there London to knock the pudgy faced twat Johnson out. Fat Etonion midget.

That's the problem with Eton. Poor diet. The day the tuck shop is replaced with proper school dinners is the day that our leadership class might just begin the long road back to redemption.
 

ElBurroSinNombre

Well-known member
On a more serious note, I actually think that vaccine supply should vary according to the risk in different areas of the country. Surely vaccinating more in areas of high infection would save more lives and bring infection rates down quicker than trying to spread the vaccine out evenly. Everybody will get vaccinated eventually, surely we should be concentrating on the areas where the risk is highest as a priority.
 
B

basilrobbie

Guest
On a more serious note, I actually think that vaccine supply should vary according to the risk in different areas of the country. Surely vaccinating more in areas of high infection would save more lives and bring infection rates down quicker than trying to spread the vaccine out evenly. Everybody will get vaccinated eventually, surely we should be concentrating on the areas where the risk is highest as a priority.

It's a good point. We hear a lot about prioritising different named groups (like key workers, the elderly and so on). I've never heard anyone making a case for concentrating on (for example) areas of high population density. Probably because they know in our current febrile political climate that doing so would be a gift to the far right.
 

ElBurroSinNombre

Well-known member
It's a good point. We hear a lot about prioritising different named groups (like key workers, the elderly and so on). I've never heard anyone making a case for concentrating on (for example) areas of high population density. Probably because they know in our current febrile political climate that doing so would be a gift to the far right.
Angela Rayner got massacred today on the Today programme trying to justify vaccinating teachers en-mass before others. Counter intuitively there is no scientific evidence that teachers are more at risk than anyone else and all vulnerable teachers would be vaccinated quickly anyway as they are in the groups higher up the list. Anyway it doesn't seem like a very well thought out line of attack from Labour.
If there is evidence that key workers are more at risk then yes they should get priority, if there is no evidence then no. We should follow the science here.
 
B

basilrobbie

Guest
Angela Rayner got massacred today on the Today programme trying to justify vaccinating teachers en-mass before others. Counter intuitively there is no scientific evidence that teachers are more at risk than anyone else and all vulnerable teachers would be vaccinated quickly anyway as they are in the groups higher up the list. Anyway it doesn't seem like a very well thought out line of attack from Labour.
If there is evidence that key workers are more at risk then yes they should get priority, if there is no evidence then no. We should follow the science here.

I can sort of see her point, and to be fair to her she is probably trying to take a VERY long term view of this ; inasmuch as a prolonged period of stagnation in schools now will possibly have a disproportionate impact upon our workforce and economy much later. If she is, more power to her, she should at least be heard and her thoughts considered.
 

ElBurroSinNombre

Well-known member
I can sort of see her point, and to be fair to her she is probably trying to take a VERY long term view of this ; inasmuch as a prolonged period of stagnation in schools now will possibly have a disproportionate impact upon our workforce and economy much later. If she is, more power to her, she should at least be heard and her thoughts considered.
TBF it is a minor detail, all teachers could be vaccinated in a couple of days (or less). And if it bring piece of mind to key workers then it probably is a good way to go. Three people in my family who work in the NHS have already been vaccinated and nobody I know thinks this is the wrong thing to do.
It is currently unclear ATM whether those vaccinated will have to self isolate if they come into contact with CV because it is unclear if and how much the different vaccines stop transmission. If those vaccinated can carry on working at little risk then they should perhaps get a higher priority.
 

Matesrates

Well-known member
TBF it is a minor detail, all teachers could be vaccinated in a couple of days (or less). And if it bring piece of mind to key workers then it probably is a good way to go. Three people in my family who work in the NHS have already been vaccinated and nobody I know thinks this is the wrong thing to do.
It is currently unclear ATM whether those vaccinated will have to self isolate if they come into contact with CV because it is unclear if and how much the different vaccines stop transmission. If those vaccinated can carry on working at little risk then they should perhaps get a higher priority.
Using that logic, police, emergency workers, delivery drivers, taxi drivers, public transport workers, shop workers, bank workers (like myself and are classified as key workers) and any other group dealing with the public should be prioritised. The current strategy is designed to save the lives of those most at risk and take pressure off the NHS. Imo that’s the right approach.
 

Junior_BentsPlatformShoes

Well-known member
None of those jobs involve you being stuck in a room with 30 plus children each day, and being exposed to them and their extended families mixing and potential of spreading the disease. It is impossible to teach with a mask on, young children cannot keep fingers out of their mouths, nor be relied on not to cough/ sneeze etc without covering up. Teachers are more at risk - get them vaccinated over half-term , get children back to school.
 

tangysider

Well-known member
On a more serious note, I actually think that vaccine supply should vary according to the risk in different areas of the country. Surely vaccinating more in areas of high infection would save more lives and bring infection rates down quicker than trying to spread the vaccine out evenly. Everybody will get vaccinated eventually, surely we should be concentrating on the areas where the risk is highest as a priority.
There is no way of varying the vaccine rollout without upsetting some group or other. The fact that all UK population is likely to be inoculated before some other countries should be a cause for optimism, but the pandemic will not finish till the whole world has built up herd immunity via exposure/infection or inoculation.
I think Spanish Flu lasted 2 or 3 years before dying out.
 

Bottle

Well-known member
Idiots! Its called “levelling up” and a keystone of the Tory Election promises in 2018 - so if the North and Midlands are doing better at vaccination numbers than the South, then its only right that the North and Midlands get hauled back so that its all Even Stevens.

And of course if the tables were turned on vaccinations, and the same applies financially too, then nothing would happen because this too is simply maintaining the status quo. Keeping things just as unequally balanced as they currently are is what the Tories mean by keeping things “level”
 

Fargo99

Well-known member
I'm 66 in Group 5 and more than happy to wait in line behind the teachers.
Children's education has been disrupted enough, get the teachers done as a priority and get schools reopened.
 

straightatthewall

Well-known member
Just to put some balance into this, the 84 year old mother in law got her first jab today down here in das capital. My mum and dad are both 75 and had theirs a week ago on the Gold Coast. I’d suspect that it’s volume over efficiency that’s causing more of a problem, although as with most things in this cycle, I reckon I could have worked out it which parts of the country would need proportionally more vaccines at any given time...
 
Top
X