1500 EU finance firms apply to open UK offices

TSSeasider

Well-known member
Another interesting impact of Brexit.

I'm not sure whether it will mitigate the job movements from London to the EU, but it does show it's not all one way.

Hopefully it encourages the EU to make it all a bit smoother, but who knows.


 

Kip

Well-known member
They only have to employ 8 people each then that's a net employment gain for the City regarding Brexit.
 

Wizaard

Well-known member
Another interesting impact of Brexit.

I'm not sure whether it will mitigate the job movements from London to the EU, but it does show it's not all one way.

Hopefully it encourages the EU to make it all a bit smoother, but who knows.


Headline says 1,000 not 1,500 but nevertheless worth watching as we go forward.
 

TSSeasider

Well-known member
They only have to employ 8 people each then that's a net employment gain for the City regarding Brexit.

Be interesting to see how it plays out then. Looks as though they don't want to lose access to the global reach of the City.

Won't affect me very much one way or the other I shouldn't have thought.
 

Kip

Well-known member
Interesting that despite the story being up for 6 hours the BBC haven't put it on their distinct 'Brexit' page. I think that page must be only for bad Brexit news.
 

BWseasider

Well-known member
The article states 1500. I'd suggest it's the pro EU BBC playing down the significance but that would be mischief making 😁.

I genuinely don't believe that.

It says a couple of paragraphs in:

"Around two-thirds had no prior physical operations in Britain, it said."

So I think it's because they're saying two thirds of the 1500 didn't have a presence in the UK before, it would be 1000 "opening offices". The remaining 500 must be assumed to already have offices here.
 

Archibald Knox

Well-known member
In other news, the Bank of England governor, Andrew Bailey, has accused the European Union of trying to poach business from the City of London in the wake of Brexit, labelling the bloc’s recent activity a “very serious escalation”.
 

Shandypants

Well-known member
In other news, the Bank of England governor, Andrew Bailey, has accused the European Union of trying to poach business from the City of London in the wake of Brexit, labelling the bloc’s recent activity a “very serious escalation”.
The bloke is a tory puppet , strange thing to come out with. What did he expect?
 

clappers

Well-known member
The rules are set globally. New York has clearing access and it’s clearly less aligned than the UK. The EU want to use sharp practices because that’s what they have always been about whilst couching things in the language of partnership.
 

Tangojoe

Well-known member
We should all just accept that we are now the competition and so are they, instead of pretending that somehow we all should get along and sing Kum by yah.

I don't think the UK was prepared for the extent of the EU's skullduggery in all matters concerning trade, vaccines, Northern Ireland etc. It thought, rightly or wrongly, well clearly wrongly , that the EU would play cricket and honour its commitments on equivalence, memorandum of understanding, shellfish and several other things. Having granted equivalence to Canada, USA, Australia, Hong Kong, Brazil etc it was assumed by the UK that the EU would do the same for us. Bad mistake. Now the UK seriously needs to stop taking punches from them and start retaliating in kind.
 
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BigHandsOliverKahn

Well-known member
I don't think the UK was prepared for the extent of the EU's skullduggery in all matters concerning trade, vaccines, Northern Ireland etc. It thought, rightly or wrongly, well clearly wrongly , that the EU would play cricket and honour its commitments on equivalence, memorandum of understanding, shellfish and several other things. Having granted equivalence to Canada, USA, Australia, Hong Kong, Brazil etc it was assumed by the UK that the EU would do the same for us. Bad mistake. Now the UK seriously needs to stop taking punches from them and start retaliating in kind.
I think nearly half the UK saw this coming and tried to avoid it. I think the UK now needs to look elsewhere to try to replace what it has lost from no longer being an EU member. It won't win many battles trying to take on the EU direct due to the size differential so is better off finding new business elsewhere with smaller or emerging economies where it can maybe gain an upper hand.
 

Tangojoe

Well-known member
The UK won't win many battles trying to take on the EU direct due to the size differential so is better off finding new business elsewhere with smaller or emerging economies where it can maybe gain an upper hand.

That might have been the case if the 27 were pulling in the same direction and were being properly led by the European Commission, but we all know that's not the case. The UK has already shown the 27 up in the vaccine shambles and will do so time and time again going forward, despite the desperate attempts by France and Germany to prevent that. You're correct though that the UK would be better off finding new business elsewhere with emerging economies where their ambitions match our own. The future of the EU without fundamental reformation is bleak.
 

tommytwojags

Well-known member
I don't think the UK was prepared for the extent of the EU's skullduggery in all matters concerning trade, vaccines, Northern Ireland etc. It thought, rightly or wrongly, well clearly wrongly , that the EU would play cricket and honour its commitments
I think nearly half the UK saw this coming and tried to avoid it.

I don't recall remainers even once mentioning the underhand, scheming, immoral tactics of the EU post-brexit. They were too busy fawning over the EU and were desperate to remain part of the corrupt organisation in a "we love you and we are so sorry to be leaving" kind of way. Surely by now those wanting to remain have realised the depths the EU will go to to undermine the UK. The EU has absolutely nothing to be proud of and those who have ambitions of rejoining the 27 should be ashamed of themselves.
 

BigHandsOliverKahn

Well-known member
I don't recall remainers even once mentioning the underhand, scheming, immoral tactics of the EU post-brexit. They were too busy fawning over the EU and were desperate to remain part of the corrupt organisation in a "we love you and we are so sorry to be leaving" kind of way. Surely by now those wanting to remain have realised the depths the EU will go to to undermine the UK. The EU has absolutely nothing to be proud of and those who have ambitions of rejoining the 27 should be ashamed of themselves.
You won't recall such words as they are your own. 😁

The long list of adjectives you have chosen suggests you are a little annoyed at how things have turned out but it was always very predictable that switching from enjoying the benefits of being in union with a large, powerful ally to then being a small direct competitor would result in the issues we are now seeing.
 

tommytwojags

Well-known member
You won't recall such words as they are your own. 😁

The long list of adjectives you have chosen suggests you are a little annoyed at how things have turned out but it was always very predictable that switching from enjoying the benefits of being in union with a large, powerful ally to then being a small direct competitor would result in the issues we are now seeing.

Tango said the UK wasn't prepared for the extent of the EU's skullduggery and you said nearly half the UK saw this coming and tried to avoid it. Can you provide a link to any prediction or mention by remainers about the EU's behaviour? I very much doubt it. As said above, remainers would have had a field day if they had foreseen how the EU was going to behave.

When you negotiate agreements you normally expect the other side to act with some dignity and fairness. Then again, maybe that's just a British thing. Either way, it reinforces the voters' decision to leave.
 

BigHandsOliverKahn

Well-known member
Tango said the UK wasn't prepared for the extent of the EU's skullduggery and you said nearly half the UK saw this coming and tried to avoid it. Can you provide a link to any prediction or mention by remainers about the EU's behaviour? I very much doubt it. As said above, remainers would have had a field day if they had foreseen how the EU was going to behave.

When you negotiate agreements you normally expect the other side to act with some dignity and fairness. Then again, maybe that's just a British thing. Either way, it reinforces the voters' decision to leave.
That was his choice of word. I was addressing the wider point that these problems were totally predicted by half the UK populations. It became labelled as Project Fear, then turned into Project Reality and now is Project Needs Sorting Out.

You can't expect competitors to act with dignitiy and fairness when we sent gun boats in to the English Channel just before the end of the year to protect our fisheries!
 

tommytwojags

Well-known member
We sent gun boats to the English Channel? A couple of Customs' cutters more like.

And the clue to the territory is in the name, although I'm surprised you called it the English Channel and not La Manche. 😆
 
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